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For those of you that don't know, I was diagnosed with ALS in March 2007. After two more opinions, the diagnosis was confirmed in the fall 2007 at age 39. This coming August (2010) I will have been married for seven years to an incredible wife, who has supported me throughout. During the course of our marriage we have been lucky to have two wonderful, amazing daughters. Sydney, will be 5 in November. Emily, will turn 2 1/2 in August. Currently, we reside in New Jersey with our Beagle, Trixie.

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Not that I would ever do anything illegal, but...

Computer still not back from tech support.  Hopefully by Friday.  Off to Univ. of Penn hospital tomorrow for quarterly visit.  In the mean time you can check out this medical abstract I found.

Cannabis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: hypothetical and practical applications, and a call for clinical trials.

Carter GT, Abood ME, Aggarwal SK, Weiss MD.

Muscular Dystrophy Association/Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Center, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. gtcarter@uw.edu

Abstract

Significant advances have increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), yet this has not translated into any greatly effective therapies. It appears that a number of abnormal physiological processes occur simultaneously in this devastating disease. Ideally, a multidrug regimen, including glutamate antagonists, antioxidants, a centrally acting anti-inflammatory agent, microglial cell modulators (including tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha] inhibitors), an antiapoptotic agent, 1 or more neurotrophic growth factors, and a mitochondrial function-enhancing agent would be required to comprehensively address the known pathophysiology of ALS. Remarkably, cannabis appears to have activity in all of those areas.  Preclinical data indicate that cannabis has powerful antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective effects. In the G93A-SOD1 ALS mouse, this has translated to prolonged neuronal cell survival, delayed onset, and slower progression of the disease. Cannabis also has properties applicable to symptom management of ALS, including analgesia, muscle relaxation, bronchodilation, saliva reduction, appetite stimulation, and sleep induction. With respect to the treatment of ALS, from both a disease modifying and symptom management viewpoint, clinical trials with cannabis are the next logical step. Based on the currently available scientific data, it is reasonable to think that cannabis might significantly slow the progression of ALS, potentially extending life expectancy and substantially reducing the overall burden of the disease.

PMID: 20439484 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Source: Cannabis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: hypoth... [Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2010] - PubMed result

3 comments:

  1. Blimey!!! Where can I get some?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Can't hurt to give it a try, right???
    ;)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Let me know...I know a guy who...........

    ReplyDelete